Manning the Nation- Father Figures in Zimbabwean Literature and Society - Edited by Kizito Muchemwa & Robert Muponde

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Description

Gender studies have tended to focus on women and their comparative under-privilege. Assuming a boarder perspective is necessary at a time when society has grown used to arguments rooted in binaries: colonized and colonizer, race and class, sex and gender, patriotism and terrorism, etc.
The editors of this book recognize that concepts of manhood can be used to repressor liberate, and will depend on historical and political imperatives; they seek to introduce a more nuanced perspective to the interconnectivity of patriarchy, masculinity, the nation and its image.
This collection of essays seeks to explore the way in which ideas of manhood are implicit to, or used by society towards specific ends.

ISBN: 9781779220691
pp. 224; 208x130mm

 


Contents

 

  • INTRODUCTION: Kizito Z. Muchemwa and Robert Muponde
  • Chapter 1
    ‘Why Don’t You Tell the Children a Story?’: Father Figures in the Zimbabwean Short Story – Kizito Z. Muchemwa
  • Chapter 2
    Killing Fathers – Robert Muponde
  • Chapter 3
    Of Fathers and Ancestors in Charles Mungoshi’s Waiting for the Rain – Neil ten Kortenaar
  • Chapter 4
    Sins of the Fathers: Revealing Family Secrets in Mungoshi’s Later Fiction – Pauline Dodgson-Katiyo
  • Chapter 5
    The Strong Healthy Man: Aids and Self-Delusion – Lizzy Attree
  • Chapter 6
    Fatherhood and Nationhood: Joshua Nkomo and the Re-imagination of the Zimbabwe Nation in the 21st Century – Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni
  • Chapter 7
    Mai Mujuru: Father of the Nation? – Lene Bull Christiansen
  • Chapter 8
    Masculinities, Race and Violence in the Making of Zimbabwe – Jane L. Parpart
  • Chapter 9
    It Couldn’t Be Anything Innocent: Negotiating Gender in Patriarchal-Racial Spaces – Ane M. Orbo Kirkegaard
  • Chapter 10
    ‘Boys’: Performing Manhood in Zimbabwean Drama – Praise Zenenga
  • Chapter 11
    ‘A Man Can Try’: Negotiating Manhoods in Colonial Urban Spaces in Dambudzo Marechera’s The House of Hunger and Yvonne Vera’s Butterfly Burning – Grace Musila
  • Chapter 12
    The Nature of Fatherhood and Manhood in Zimbabwean Texts of Pre-Colonial and Colonial Settings – Mickias Musiyiwa and Memory Chirere
  • Chapter 13
    ‘My father – the Hero ?’ The Father-Daughter Relationship in Zimbabwean Literature and Culture – Anna Chitando and Angeline M. Madongonda